Stats on Browsers, Operating Systems, used in browsers

I found some nice information on which browsers are being used, which resolutions and operating systems are running them, what desktop resolutions they have, etc. Very nice. See how fast Vista is losing usership…

Info courtesy W3Schools

Posted under Browsers, Network, Operating System, WebDev

This post was written by Content Curator on February 2, 2010

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to make Windows “forget” network share login

Sometimes in testing network settings and authentication ( for instance when setting up a Samba server and users on a CentOS, Ubuntu, or Feroda Linux system) I often find it useful to force my Windows PC client to “forget” the login username and password that it has on record, for the current session, so that I may login again with another username/password combo. Easily accomplished, this Windows trick works on all modern Microsoft operating systems.

The situation: You need to login again to a network share on a Windows file server, or a Linux server,  without rebooting the client computer.

The fix: Disconnect from the shares using the NET command.

  1. Open a command prompt. (My favorite way is: Win-R, type cmd, press Enter)
  2. Type NET USE * /DELETE
  3. It will prompt you for verification, type Y and Enter.

That’s it! Enjoy, and may your login be forgotten!

Courtesy, Microsoft: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308582

Posted under Microsoft, Network, Software, Windows

How To Make puTTY Automatically Load a Session

The most awesome emulator of all time, puTTY.exe, just got even easier to use. Along with loggiong automatically into a SSH session add the Windows shortcut that loads a saved session and launches it, now you have one click shell access to your Linux host from your Windows PC.

Here’s how:

  1. Download puTTY.exe
  2. Save it to the folder  C:\puTTY\
  3. Open a Windows Explorer window in C:\puTTY\
  4. Run puTTY.exe once, and create a “saved session”, making note of what you name it. My example below uses the name my neatly named Saved Session
  5. Right-click-drag puTTY.exe and drop it next to itself, this creates a shortcut to the .exe file.
  6. Right-click the shortcut you just created, on the popup menu click Properties.
  7. In the Target box, add -load “your-saved-session-name” after C:\putty\putty.exe
  8. The final content in the target box should look like:
    C:\putty\putty.exe -load "my neatly named Saved Session"
  9. Save the shortcut. Viola! Move or copy this shortcut anywhere you like (e.g. your Desktop, your QuickLaunch toolbar, your custom explorer toolbar, etc.) and you have 1-click access to a command prompt on your Linux / Unix host.

Enjoy!

Posted under Apple, Freeware, Linux, Microsoft, Network, Software, WebDev, ZyXel

This post was written by Content Curator on December 5, 2009

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Use puTTY to automatically login a SSH session

Many thanks to Jon Lee at jonlee.ca for this excellent procedure allowing for the automtic login of a session using SSH and puTTY.exe terminal emulator. You da man!

——————————-

From his site:

As many web developers can attest to, logging into your server through SSH (Secure Shell) is one of the more common day-to-day tasks (you can even use it as a secure tunnel for your traffic). It only makes sense to automate this process which in turn can save many many keystrokes.

This how-to is written with PuTTY and Windows in mind and requires several other tools that are available from PuTTY’s website. So from their download page, make sure you have these files:

  • PuTTY (putty.exe)
  • PuTTYgen (puttygen.exe)

Then to automate SSH login, do the following:

  1. Run PuTTYgen.
  2. Select SSH-2 DSA as the Type of Key to generate.
  3. Click generate and move your mouse around to generate randomness.
  4. Click “Save Private Key” and save it somewhere on your computer.
  5. Copy the entire content inside the box to your clipboard (this is your generated public key).
  6. Login to your SSH server.
  7. Create the file ~/.ssh/authorized_keys containing the generated public key (from step 3) on a single line.
  8. Make this file readable (chmod 755).
  9. Then open up PuTTY and navigate to Connection->Data and fill in the auto-login username.
  10. Navigate to Connection->SSH->Auth and under Private-key, browse to the file you had saved earlier on your computer.

That’s it! Now you can try logging in to your SSH server and it should login automatically. If it works, make sure you save your session so you don’t have to repeat these steps every time!

Hopefully these steps work for everyone! Let me know if there are any problems.

——————————-

Had some problems with a CentOS5 server not accepting keys… found that this server was being finicky for some reason, and used this article on how to generate the keys on the Linux server, and then import the public key to the client Windows box. To make it automatically login simply do not enter any passphrase. This is probably a huge security risk or something like that, but if you’re using it on a secured LAN then perhaps it’s ok.

Posted under Linux, Network

This post was written by Content Curator on November 27, 2009

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How To Copy Directories and Subdirectories Recursively With FTP (scp)

When transferring file directory structures between linux / Unix hosts, usinf FTP was what came to mind.  FTP has been used for many transfers in the past, but when forced (read:allowed) to use the command line to transfer files, the MGET and other FTP related commands were useless. So google to the rescue, and up pops this great simple writeup about how to copy host-to-host using the SCP command. Sweetness defined.

In essence:

scp -vr -P 2222 ./* REMOTEUSERNAME@REMOTEHOSTNAME.TLD:/FULL/UNIX/PATH/TO/DESTINATION/FOLDER/(OR/FILENAMES.ABC)

This command will Verbosely and Recirsively do it’s thang. It will contact the remote host on port 2222 instead of the default port 22 used for SSH. The remote username is the unix username, and the remote hostname is the full DNS name or IP address of the remote unix box. The destination path is reltive to the root of the system, NOT relative to the user’s home dirtectory.

Have fun, and leave FTP for transferring single files or batches of files inside a single directory container only.

Posted under Freeware, Linux, Network

How To Tell Windows XP To Not Look For New Wireless Networks

In order to make Windows XP ignore new wireless networks, there must be some sort of registry tweak or something, right? There must be some way to force the manual setup of new wireless network connections in Windows, right? Let’s find out… After a bit of Googling came up with these:

http://antivirus.about.com/od/securitytips/ht/wirelessconn.htm
This one may be true, but on the system I checked the checkbox mentioned was not ticked.  Not to mention, this does not keep the wireless adapter from finding, or scanning for, new wireless networks and reporting that they are in view.

Posted under Microsoft, Network, Wireless

How to fix “is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Access is denied.” Network error with accessing XP windows shares

Trying to access a Windows XP host computer over a LAN (local area network) and get into it’s shared folders.

This little turd of an error can be really irritating. It happens when trying to access a shared folder, or any shares, on a remote, but LAN networked, Windows XP computer. After running the Network Setup Wizard on the host computer, and enabling file and printer sharing, it just won’t go away. In Windows XP Professional, you can go into the explorer view settings, and disable Simple File Sharing, which didn’t fix it either.

The fix ended up being a simple registry edit, suggested by Microsoft: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/913628

Here is the process:

To resolve this issue, set the value of the restrictanonymous registry entry to 0. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
  2. Locate and then double-click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa
  3. On the right side, double-click restrictanonymous.
  4. Make sure that the value in the Value data box is set to 0, and then click OK.
  5. Close Registry Editor.
  6. Restart the computer.

This worked like a charm more than once for me.

Posted under Microsoft, Network, WordPress

Fedora 9 connect: Network is unreachable error

Ran across this installing Red Hat’s free Linux distribution Fedora Core 9 code named Suplhur. Installed totally vanilla install with the GUI anaconda front end. The box sees the NIC, and can ping within the local subnet of the LAN network, but can’t ping out. BTW, it holds a static IP on the network interface card (NIC). Gets the error:

connect: Network is unreachable error

We need to set a default route. Here’s how:

Looked in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts for the file route-eth0 but it wasn’t there.

Using vi (you can use whichever text editor you prefer) I created that file route-eth0, and put in this one line:

defult via 192.168.0.1

(note: 192.168.0.1 is the LAN IP address of my router. Your router IP address may differ. So you should put in whatever the IP addres of your router is, instead. Most Netgear routers and Qwest DSL boradband modems use 192.168.0.1 and Linksys uses 192.168.1.1 and Belkin uses 192.168.2.1 just to name some common ones.)

Then a simple task of restarting the network and testing:

# service network restart
# ping yahoo.com

Success!

Also, I found that the ethernet adapters weren’t starting automatically. Using the GUI taskbar/ Start Menu, I went into System Administration, then into Services, and enabled the “network” service. Then change runlevel to 3. Ping works so eth0 is up, and that happened at the runlevel change. Change to runlevel 5, test, and… yeppers, it works.

Posted under Freeware, Linux, Network

ZyXel G-200 Plus status lights

LAN 1 thru 4 lights illuminate orange when connected

WAN blink green

SYS solid green

PWR solid green

Posted under Network, Uncategorized, ZyXel

This post was written by Content Curator on September 17, 2007

Tags: , , , , , , , ,